Interfaith ceremony - Planning for our big day
Planning for our big day
 

I've been thinking alot lately about our ceremony, being that we are having an interfaith ceremony and all.  I purchased a book recently " Joining hands and hearts " which is kind of a guide for interfaith couples.  It looks very uplifting and positive, so I will definitly write a review if I find it useful.  I also want to start looking for an officiant once the summer winds down and we have the weekends back to ourselves.
I also found this article on www.wetv.com that talks about interfaith couples  and just wanted to share being that it was so positive.  Article written by Emily Shwartz:

"Interfaith” is a scary word. There’s something daunting about it, something big and unsure. It’s not often read as a light, lovely word, but rather a heavy, tangled one. You can almost see the confusing mess trailing behind it, struggling and ominous. Interfaith. I challenge you to speak the word with grace. It can be done; this I assure you. I do it. And as a product of an interfaith marriage, let me sing it loud and clear: it is a beautiful thing.

Life As A Cashew (Catholic and Jewish, For Those Unfamiliar With The Lingo)I’ve heard it again and again: “So wait, you were raised with two religions?” as if I was raised with two heads or something.Yes, in a sense, I was. When my Father, born into a moderate, Reform Jewish family, decided it was best to marry my Mother, a freelance Catholic, things—so I hear—went over surprisingly well. When I came into the picture there was little doubt on either side of the family that they were good parents and good people. All was well.

Growing up, I didn’t truly realize how unique my situation was. I celebrated Passover and Easter, Hanukkah and Christmas. My parents did me a wonderful service by teaching the stories behind all the holidays we celebrated and explaining the differences in religions. The morals were often the same: be a good person; do the right thing. I never felt lost or misplaced, but quite the opposite: I felt empowered and educated. I was armed with the best ammunition possible – a multi-faceted perspective on life. That’s right, kiddos: I had a Bubbee and a Nana. Watch out.

As I got older, it occurred to me that my situation was an ideal illustration of how an interfaith marriage – and family – would function. It dawned on me that not all couples are able to handle the complexities that an interfaith marriage brings…with due reason. It’s not easy.

Care For A Challenge?


If you search for “Interfaith Marriage” on Amazon.com, over 900 titles surface. Nine hundred! With titles like “What To Do If You’re Dating a Jew”, “Dear Rabbi, Why Can’t I Marry Her?”, But How Will You Raise the Children?”, it seems as though society is trying—hard—to accommodate a controversial trend. Just how controversial is it? Try Googling the same term: one of the first few articles that come up is one called “Interfaith Marriage Stumbling Blocks”. The prognosis looks grim—but should surely not to be confused with impossible.

Consider this take on things: marriage is a union between two people and should be celebrated, not condemned. Differences should be embraced, cultures should be shared, and love should have room to blossom and soar. If you are a devout Orthodox Jew, for example, chances are you’re not marrying outside of your faith to begin with; it’s just not what you “do”. But if you’re a modern day Reform kinda gal and you stumble upon a baptized Prince Charming, what’s the worst that can happen—you fall in love and live happily ever after? You engage in witty banter and heated discussion? You hear another side of the story? Another set of values, beliefs, ideals? Just imagine how dull the world would be if we were all the same shade of gray. Where are the brave brides ready to take on this challenge?



Carrying The Banner

If you’re bold enough to throw some interfaith color into your wedding day scheme, go for it. Embrace it. “Interfaith” is not a taboo label—it is a liberating one. Wear it with pride. Be that woman people admire for her courage, bravery, and killer intuition. Believe it or not, even the gutsiest gals have their worries about jumping into an interfaith relationship. Pay no mind to the critics—you’re plenty capable of making your own decisions. Carry the interfaith banner high and proud, girls. It’s worth it."




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